Audio Files For Brown, John Mason

  • Ernest Hemingway - This recording opens with clips describing Hemingway and with Marlon Brando reading from "The Old Man and the Sea." The recording continues with a mix of biographical information, anecdotes, and critical appraisals of Hemingway's work. Highlights include excerpts from the Kansas City Star style sheet, parodies of Hemingway's writing and Max Eastman's account of a fight he and Hemingway got into in Max Perkins's Scribner's office. The recording ends with a recitation of Hemingway's Nobel Prize acceptance speech. It appears that Hemingway himself reads the speech.

  • Ernest Hemingway - This recording opens with clips describing Hemingway and with Marlon Brando reading from "The Old Man and the Sea." The recording continues with a mix of biographical information, anecdotes, and critical appraisals of Hemingway's work. Highlights include excerpts from the Kansas City Star style sheet, parodies of Hemingway's writing and Max Eastman's account of a fight he and Hemingway got into in Max Perkins's scribner's office. The recording ends with a recitation of Hemingway's Nobel Prize acceptance speech. It appears that Hemingway himself reads the speech.

  • What's Wrong With the Comics? (America's Town Meeting of the Air) - Capp continues his comments from reel one and characterizes comic book artists as storytellers. Brown rushes to the defense of the classics. Capp responds by describing the comics as a form for expression and says that many great contemporary artists work in the comics. Topics from the question-and-answer portion of the program include: the intellectual content of the comics, condensing literature into comic book form, and comics as an educational tool.

  • What's Wrong With the Comics? (America's Town Meeting of the Air) - Capp continues his comments from reel one and characterizes comic book artists as storytellers. Brown rushes to the defense of the classics. Capp responds by describing the comics as a form for expression and says that many great contemporary artists work in the comics. Topics from the question-and-answer portion of the program include: the intellectual content of the comics, condensing literature into comic book form, and comics as an educational tool.

  • What's Wrong with the Comics? (America's Town Meeting of the Air) - John Mason Brown uses comic books with his kids as a last resort and wishes they would read something with deeper intellectual content. George Hecht praises the entertainment value of the comics in a 'troubled' world and views them as a new means of communication. Marya Mannes discusses the bad effect of the comics on children's growth. She feels they work as a substitute for the imagination and goes on to deplore their violence and grammar. Al Capp implies that the comics have the same content as the news on the front page and in books.

  • What's Wrong with the Comics? (America's Town Meeting of the Air) - John Mason Brown uses comic books with his kids as a last resort and wishes they would read something with deeper intellectual content. George Hecht praises the entertainment value of the comics in a 'troubled' world and views them as a new means of communication. Marya Mannes discusses the bad effect of the comics on children's growth. She feels they work as a substitute for the imagination and goes on to deplore their violence and grammar. Al Capp implies that the comics have the same content as the news on the front page and in books.