Audio Technology

Recording

Microphones

Introduction
Frequency response
Polar Patterns
Proximity effect
Cabling and phantom power

Recording techniques

Recording environment
Microphone placement
Signal processing and special effects

Pre-amplifiers

Recording devices

Introduction
Analog recorders
Digital recorders
DAT recorders
Minidisk recorders
PC card and CD-R recorders
Hard disk recorders

Processing

A-to-D conversion

Improving audio digitization
Digitization workflow

Analysis and Delivery

Introduction
Preparing files for analysis and delivery
Digital restoration
LPC in acoustic analysis

Audio Technology / Recording / Recording Devices / DAT recorders...

DAT recorders use magnetic tape as a storage medium. Typical DAT tapes allow the storage of 120 minutes of uncompressed, high-quality mono recording at 48,000 Hz/16-bit. TASCAM DA-P1 (PHOTO>>) offers sophisticated time coding, rugged construction, and a pair of good pre-amplifiers. It also comes with a built-in limiter and microphone/line inputs. It features the S/PIDF digital I/O interface. The migration of digital audio from DAT to a personal computer hard drive for analysis is a lossless process, provided the correct digital transfer interface is used. The DAT tape is as fragile as a regular analog cassette tape, which, again, raises the issue of long-term preservation. Most digital-born recordings stored on DAT tapes will eventually have to be migrated to either spinning disk or optical storage.


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